The radar is a detection system that relies on the transmission of radio waves to discern the range, velocity, and/or angle of an object. Depending on the application, a radar may be used to detect and monitor aircraft, spacecraft, ships, missiles, weather formations, automobiles, or terrain. While radar technology now serves numerous industries and applications with its functionalities, it was not too long ago that its development was a top military secret.


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Prior to the 1970s, very few aircraft had an avionics master switch for the simple reason that aircraft simply didn’t have many avionics to protect. Another reason aircraft from this era didn’t need an avionics master switch was because vacuum tube radios weren’t subject to damage from spikes in the charging system when the aircraft was started with the radios already turned on. However, that all changed when tubes were replaced by silicon. If you start the aircraft’s engine with modern, solid-state radios turned on, there is a good chance you will damage the avionics. Even if it isn’t plain to see, the damage will have been done.


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The landing gear system of an aircraft is crucial to its operations, ensuring that the vehicle is capable of landing and stopping on a runway without risking damage or safety. With a plethora of moving parts that are in constant interaction and the impact forces caused by touchdowns, landing gear needs to be regularly inspected and serviced to ensure that any issue or hazard is detected and remedied as soon as possible. From cleaning parts to remove contaminants to conducting adjustments for assemblies, the maintenance of landing gear systems is thorough and requires precision to be carried out correctly.


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While major aircraft accidents are extremely rare in occurrence, it is critical that investigators are always able to thoroughly determine what caused the incident so that it can be prevented in the future. With flight recorder devices placed within an aircraft, investigators can access pertinent information such as flight data, pilot conversations, and much more. In this blog, we will discuss the functionality and use of flight recorder equipment, allowing you to better understand their immense role in continuing safety efforts for aviation.


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The fuel system is a crucial facet of aircraft operation, allowing for the combustion of fuel and air mixtures to achieve heavier-than-air-flight. Despite its advanced construction and robust capabilities, the aircraft fuel system is vulnerable to a variety of issues and damages that are caused by fuel contamination. Oftentimes, the contamination damage that a fuel system may face ranges from the corrosion of the fuel tank to the failure of components. As such, being aware of the common causes of fuel contamination, as well as how to prevent them, can greatly aid in the protection of the aircraft fuel system. Generally speaking, the most common contaminants that can affect the aircraft fuel system and its parts include water, particles, and microorganisms.


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There are many great reasons to repair items during aircraft maintenance rather than replacing them altogether. The benefits of this include cost-saving, keeping a serviceable item in service, helping a mechanic gain business, and creating less waste. However, it is important to differentiate when a part can be repaired versus when it must be replaced. In this blog we will discuss this conundrum in further detail.


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Aircraft owners all know the joy of owning their own private aircraft and having the skies at their fingertips. However, aircraft owners also know the many aircraft-related fees that pile up month after month. From hangar fees to fuel and general maintenance, yearly costs can reach tens of thousands of dollars. As such, many people look for quick and easy ways to save a bit of money. This leads many aircraft owners to ask the question “can I replace aviation oil with automotive engine oil?” The simple answer is no, but this blog will go into greater detail about the differences between the two oils and why they aren’t interchangeable.


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Printed circuit boards (PCB) are an electronic product that serve as the backbone of many electronics and systems, providing mechanical support and electrical interconnectivity between components. Printed circuit boards serve virtually all commercially produced electronic devices, ranging in application from remote controls to computer servers. In order for a printed circuit board to function properly, they require various parts and components to be attached to them, each playing their different roles to conduct operations as a whole. In this blog, we will discuss some of the commonly used printed circuit board components, allowing you to better understand how they provide for electronics and systems.


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In the realm of internet networking and wireless communications, it can be confusing to understand what each device contributes and how each functions. The modem and router in particular are two network devices that are commonly confused for one another, especially with modern devices often combining the two in one single unit. Despite this, understanding the difference between the two devices can greatly benefit your knowledge of computer networks and communications, allowing you to be more aware when working with such devices.


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There are various manners and methods in which mechanics can go about implementing safe aircraft turbine engine maintenance. Turbine support strategies differ generally as indicated by the plan and development of the specific motor. The point by point strategies suggested by the manufacturer ought to be followed when performing reviews or support. For more details on the procedures and the factors that affect maintenance, read the article below.


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While the aircraft may be one of the greatest engineering marvels of our time, their advanced technology and capabilities are fairly meaningless when disassembled. Fasteners are commercial hardware parts that may be used to secure two or more components together in either a permanent or non-permanent fashion. Millions of fasteners may be used to assemble structures, equipment, systems, and other components of a single aircraft. Rivets in particular are an important type of mechanical aircraft fastener that is often used for much of the assembly of an aircraft, and there are many types of rivets that are installed throughout the structure. As aircraft hardware parts, roughly 40,000 rivets may be used on a single Boeing 747 wing for assembly and integrity, acting as testament to their importance for aviation. In this blog, we will discuss how rivets function to hold an aircraft together, as well as the various common types of rivets that may be present on an aircraft.


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The applied science of hydraulics has been a part of human ingenuity since ancient times. From irrigation to dams, humans have established the utilization of the forces of water pressure for applications such as transmission, generation, and control of power. In the realm of aviation, the aircraft hydraulic system has been an integral facet of aircraft in-flight functions since the 1920’s. Over time, the uses of hydraulic power and aircraft hydraulic system components have steadily increased due to their cost-effectiveness, reliability, and capabilities. In this blog, we will discuss the basics of the aircraft hydraulic system, what components they help power, as well as their advantages.


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The turboprop engine is a configuration of a turbine engine that powers a connected propeller. Turbine engines are incredibly complex, but in their most basic form, not as daunting as they might seem. The primary components of a turboprop engine are an air intake engine, compressor, combustor, turbine, and propelling nozzle. Air is drawn in via the intake where it is compressed by the compressor. The compressed air moves into the combustor or combustion chamber, where fuel is added and the mixture ignites. This hot, combusted gas expands and is pushed toward a vector. The expanding gas is directed toward the propeller through the reduction gearing. Further expansion of these gases occurs in the propelling nozzle where they are reduced to atmospheric pressure. A turboprop engine’s exhaust gases do not contain enough energy to create significant thrust, so the aircraft relies on the spinning propellers to produce thrust.


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You tend to run across many different connectors when you’re working out in the field. Even the most skilled can find it difficult to distinguish between different tools and connectors. If you’re among the workforce employed in the manufacturing and supply chain industry, it’s important to learn how to differentiate between your tools. Here, we’ll discuss two common connectors tools that are often seen in and used for smaller line fittings.


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The main difference between a turboprop and a turbojet is that the former refers to a jet engine with a propeller attached to the front, while the latter is simply your standard jet engine. If you are in the market to purchase either a turboprop or turbojet, but are unsure of which to select, consider the benefits that each carry. This article will discuss more about the different benefits that each offers.


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Each aircraft features a system of intricate hardware known as flight controls working in harmony to perform the tasks needed for flight. Within each flight control system, there is a primary and secondary control system. The primary control system is made up of the ailerons, elevator/stabilator, and rudder. In the secondary system you will find the aircraft wing flaps, leading edge devices, spoilers, and trim systems.


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Thanks to the rise of affordable integrated circuitry, modern general aviation aircraft now mount a wide range of electronics and avionics capable of offering pilots real-time displays of weather conditions, navigating in all three dimensions thanks to satellite signals, and storing a comprehensive database of engine operation parameters. However, these devices require a reliable power source, which takes the form of a generator or alternator. These devices are rated in volts and amps in terms of their power output. Generators and alternators come in 12 and 14 volt variants, with 12 volt variants running at 12, 15, 25, 38, 50, and 60 amps, while 24-volt alternators typically feature 60 or 95 amps.


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As with any aircraft, fasteners are an extremely important component that enables the fixing of one part to another. Set screws are a rare form of screws that are an important fastener for when components need to be secured without any protrusions. The entire body of the screw is threaded and is headless, often being installed with an allen key or special tools. The screw is installed into a threaded hole of the two objects to prevent movement of one object relative to the other. One of the more common examples for set screw use is securing a pulley or gear to a shaft.


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At high altitudes, temperatures can drop below zero degrees Fahrenheit. Combined with seasonally cold temperatures, heating an aircraft’s cabin interior becomes a necessity, not a luxury. Pressurized aircraft use air cycle conditioning systems that mix bleed air from the engines with cold air produced by the air cycle machine expansion turbine to obtain warm air for the cabin. Some turbine-powered aircraft not equipped with air cycle systems still use engine compressor bleed air to heat the cabin, by mixing it with ambient air, or cabin return air, and distributing it back throughout the aircraft via ducting. These bleed air heating systems are simple and function well, as long as the valves, ducting, and controls work well.


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Resistor networks are networks of… resistors. Obviously. They combine groups of three to over twenty resistors in a single IC-like package. An array is a subset of networks, all of which have the same ohmic value.


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Spend enough time reading about machinery of any kind, and you will see repeated references to things like bolts, screws, and studs. But for the uninformed, these labels can seem interchangeable and vague? What differentiates a bolt from a screw from a stud? In this blogpost, we will explore and define these differences.


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Bearings are used in many of the machines we use on a daily basis. If bearings didn’t exist, we would constantly be replacing parts, which would inevitably slow down productivity. The bearing was designed with a simple concept in mind— objects can roll better than they can slide. Bearing design is based on the magnitude and direction of the load that they are intended to support.


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            A constant speed propeller allows a pilot to delegate specific engine speed (RPM) per stage of flight. The ability to maintain “on” speed functioning is due to a component called the aircraft propeller governor— Ello, Guv’nor! It’s the governor's job to maintain a pilot specified RPM when the blades are moving over speed or under speed. Though turbofan and turbojet aircraft require constant speed capabilities as well, the use of a governor to achieve this is most often seen in a turboprop engine.


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           ‘Cost effective’, ‘reliable’, and ‘efficient’— all words we love to hear about an engine, and ones that aptly describe the turboprop design. Not to be confused with turbofan and turbojet aircrafts, a turboprop powered aircraft enters a class all on its own.?


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Abrasives are one of the most common tools in any manufacturing industry. They’re used to buff, sand, grind, and polish surfaces— as long as the abrasive is harder than the material you’re trying to finish, the abrasive will be very effective. Because abrasives are used for so many different applications, there are many different types to choose from.


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An abrasive is a material used to polish and grind objects. There are many ways to use abrasives, making it a versatile and popular tool. Today we will be discussing various types of abrasives, the difference in roughness, and what their use.


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In the aerospace and aviation industries, every rough surface, sharp edge, or imperfection has the potential to lead to disastrous consequences. Or, at the very least, cost a lot of money as a result of decreased efficiency caused by higher friction and wear-and-tear. As a result, abrasives are an important part of the manufacturing process.

Abrasives are the hard crystals either manufactured or found in nature are materials used to clean, grind, or polish hard surfaces like metals and alloys. They’re also commonly used to work with other materials such as stone, glass, plastic, wood, and rubber. Abrasives work by scratching. The particles will first penetrate the surface and then cause a tearing off of particles. However, it only works if the abrasive is has a higher hardness rating than the abraded material. As a result, the most common abrasives are made of materials like aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, cubic boron nitride, and even diamond, which have Mohs hardness ratings of 9+.


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          Aircraft wheel bearings, like all other parts of the aircraft, need proper care and maintenance in order to continue performing at the highest capacity, which means that they need grease. But, they can not just use any grease, and certainly not automotive grease. Your average sedan isn’t going to experience the same stresses and conditions that a commercial jetliner does. Aviation parts need aviation grease specially designed with certain applications in mind. So, with that being said, here are the top 3 aviation greases for the aircraft wheel bearings.


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